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Mainstream media and some religious preachers are decrying QAnon as a baseless conspiracy theory, and many claims are being all thrown into the same stream, muddying the waters. However, this article will provide clarity.

Before you throw the baby out with the bathwater, it’s worth investigating a spin-free, agenda-free explanation of QAnon.

QAnon: Why should Christians care?

At its core, QAnon is a self-described group of patriots striving to wake people up about the deep state activities occurring within government in the United States. They say you can’t fight a problem you didn’t know existed.

The QAnon community is also made up of people who profess a belief in God and Jesus Christ and are concerned about the way religion is being eradicated from the fabric of America.

It alleges that these deep state operators are working against conservative interests in general and President Donald Trump in particular.

The group alleges far-left operators and progressives are trying to change the core of America’s long-held values. It points to corporate interests, banking interests, mainstream media, and wealthy puppet masters.

QAnon also alleges that the handful of corporations controlling media companies, most of which are left-leaning, are complicit in spreading disinformation and silencing conservative voices. It accuses the mainstream media of both “hiding things in plain sight” and underreporting or not reporting certain information at all. It alleges the media is purposely misleading the public to create a narrative that supports the interests of the left.

As you can undoubtedly discern, Christians and conservatives didn’t need QAnon to tell them some of these things, because they are already happening. However, there is deeper information and that is what QAnon seeks to release.

Separating fact from fiction: What to look for

Before explaining what QAnon is, some guidelines and warnings should be given here both in terms of those seeking to find factual information about QAnon, as well as how to avoid the disinformation and truly baseless claims.

There is an overabundance of information about QAnon circulating on the Internet. The first thing you have to be aware of is that most of it is unreliable, exaggerated or completely false and not coming from QAnon, especially what you may find on Twitter, Facebook and numerous websites.

The most reliable information comes directly from QAnon (aka Q), and then is distributed by official moderators.

If you truly want a primer on the QAnon movement, a book might be a better place to start. There are some free books on Amazon and some so-called “primers” but some of those are also a bit too basic and made more confused than enlightened.

One book that will walk you through the QAnon movement from its inception forward is titled “Calm before the Storm (Q Chronicles Book 1).” (If you have Kindle unlimited, you can read this book for free). This book will explain where to find reliable information, what to look for in verifying the information, and explain how the information is presented and why the information is disseminated in a specific way.

Primer: QAnon 101

QAnon, or Q, is an anonymous person or persons claiming to be patriots that have posted insider information about the supposed goings-on behind the scenes in the United States government.

QAnon is likely a White House or Washington insider

Many believe QAnon is likely a person or persons within the US government with very close access to the president. This is due to the factual content of some of QAnon’s posts, many of which have been made mere minutes ahead of the White House or media outlets reporting on particular events. Further, certain posts have contained facts in advance that only someone in close proximity to the president could be privy to.

The official source of QAnon posts

The official QAnon posts were originally made at 4Chan, then 8Chan. Moderators were then move information to Twitter and Facebook. The messages are coded and take deciphering work to unravel.

QAnon posts contain real facts

There are some well-established facts from the true posts that can’t be denied and can be verified with Internet searches. Some posts directly refer to things “hidden in plain sight” within media reports.

The motto is: Trust but verify.

When a conspiracy is not a conspiracy

In truth, many so-called “conspiracy theories” do in fact contain facts and elements of truth. Whether those facts add up to the alleged overall plot is another matter.

The whole “pizzagate” scandal, for example, while not true in the broad sense of the conspiracy as a massive child sex ring, parts of the scandal did contain some alarming facts.

Courtesy of Wikileaks, emails showed that connections between the Hillary Clinton and the Podesta brothers. They show connections between the Podesta brothers and the pizza chain. The Podesta brothers do own some very strange artwork that portrays children in bondage, which baffles the mind of anyone as to why any human being, regardless of how open-minded they are, would want to display such art

The emails also show an invitation Hillary Clinton, by one of the Podesta brothers, inviting her to connect with “Maria.”

Maria refers to performance artist Maria Abramović whose work “spirit cooking” involved a type of sex magic, that of black magician Aleister Crowley, involving blood, breast milk and fresh sperm. She also did a creepy cannibalistic display in 2011 at a MoCA Gala attended by numerous celebrities. She has been photographed in front of a goat’s head pentagram written on the wall and blood, while holding a bloodied goat skull by the horns.

The above facts are not conspiracies nor did they come out of thin air. The emails and articles and photographs exist to prove such connections. At the very least, they show a connection between Washington politicians and the occult, perhaps Satanism. In fairness, it does not prove that these political figures have any engagement or involvement in the black arts, but it seems to indicate they showed, at the very least, an interest to observe.

QAnon purposely uses some disinformation in posts

One must also keep in mind, QAnon knows that enemies are also reading the posts and, therefore, uses disinformation to keep them off-track, knowing they might use the true information in a harmful way, such as discrediting the truth or preventing information from being distributed.

QAnon says Trump is trying to drain the swamp, surrounded by enemies

In essence, QAnon believes there is a deep state cabal – the swamp – that has been working to take down Trump even before he was in office. The actions of the Democratic Party in collusion with members of the FBI with the Russia hoax, as well as the impeachment hoax, certainly support that claim. You can get these facts straight from the daily news.

“Conspiracy theory” is an easy, misleading spin by the left

Mainstream media, Democrats, and even some Republicans have characterized QAnon as a baseless, far-right conspiracy theory. It should be obvious by now, that anytime someone speaks certain truths, someone quickly tries to label it as a “conspiracy theory” so that the information will be ignored.

One must keep in mind that many of the claims that QAnon is a conspiracy theory without merit are being made by people who have not done any of their homework to investigate what QAnon is about. They have gathered their information from the wrong sources and not the official source. It takes work to decode QAnon posts that come from the original source. Most journalists and others are not putting in the effort.

Further, many mainstream outlets purposely are denouncing QAnon to ensure the truth stays buried. Just like the Jeffrey Epstein death. Any rational mind would see the string of too many coincidences as exceedingly unlikely, yet the media still wants you to believe in a suicide. Same idea here.

Further, these people calling QAnon a conspiracy theory are taking their information from social media posts (Twitter, Facebook) that comes from followers, rather than directly from the real source. Because of this, they are looking at diluted or even fake information, and then write off QAnon as baseless.

QAnon Lingo

There is some common language the newbie may not understand when reading QAnon-related posts or information. Here is a basic glossary.

WWG1WGA: An acronym for “where we go one, we go all.”

Q Drop: A message from Q.

Normie: A normal person walk around oblivious to the war of good versus evil.

Breadcrumb: A clue within a Q message..

Bread: An organization of breadcrumbs which lead to a better understanding of a Q message.

Baker: A person who researches the breadcrumbs to create actionable information, a.k.a. bread.

MSM: mainstream media.

LARP: Live action role-playing.

Trump praises QAnon patriots

During a press conference from the White House on Wednesday, August 19, 2020, President Donald Trump offered praise for the people who support QAnon, which even includes some Republican candidates.

President Trump was asked by a reporter about the QAnon community, NPR reported.

“They like me very much,” Trump replied, “I heard that these are people who love our country.”

The reporter then offered a summarization, reflecting the standard mainstream media spin of portraying what the QAnon movement is supposedly all about: Trump is leading a secret, government-led charge against pedophiles, cannibals and satanic worshippers.”

“Is that supposed to be a bad thing?” Trump asked. “If I can help save the world from problems, I’m willing to do it,”

Numerous mainstream media outlets have recently attempted to tarnish a number of Republican candidates who have expressed support of the QAnon community, as well as have lambasted Trump for speaking favorably of QAnon supporters.